Panels

China is fourth-largest country on earth, and has the highest population in the entire world, but it also has one of the world’s lowest coffee consumption rates: citizens consume, on average, of just one cup a year. While this might not sound promising, coffee consumption rates in China are growing at 30% a year, compared to an international rate of 2%. For producers and roasters looking to enter an untapped market, it offers incredible potential.

What makes specialty coffee special? We know the quality is much better than commercial-grade beans, but why?

If there’s one thing millennials around the world have in common, it’s a taste for coffee. This group makes up a major percentage of the world’s coffee drinkers, so it’s a generation worth taking note of if you run a coffee shop or roastery and want to stay ahead. Tapping into this market is crucial for business success, but it won’t happen without an understanding of the trends that drive their behaviour.

The Middle East is experiencing huge growth in its coffee industry. Specialty coffee shop chains thrive here, particularly in Dubai and Saudi Arabia. With over 9,000 branded coffee outlets in 12 countries, the region has ample opportunity for investors and is providing a new market for global producers.

China is fourth-largest country on earth, and has the highest population in the entire world, but it also has one of the world’s lowest coffee consumption rates: citizens consume, on average, of just one cup a year. While this might not sound promising, coffee consumption rates in China are growing at 30% a year, compared to an international rate of 2%. For producers and roasters looking to enter an untapped market, it offers incredible potential.

Natural, washed, and honey coffees with unique profiles are familiar specialty coffee offerings. But this doesn’t mean producers aren’t also open to experimental processing. In coffee, processing is crucial. More than just drying and the removal of mucilage, each method affects a lot’s flavours and sensory characteristics in unique ways. Control coffee processing and you can maintain – or even increase – quality and consistency.

How much was the farmer who grew your coffee paid?  Finding an answer to this seemingly simple question is challenging. So challenging, in fact, that most cafés and specialty coffee roasters don’t know the answer. This is a major concern. When higher prices are being paid, does any of that reach the farmers? Are we supporting sustainable production?

Teresa, Sergio and Walter will explore sustainable practices, fair trade certification, and environmental practice, exploring what’s practical and possible for producers.

Join LWR’s Ralph Merriam and Rick Peyser from Lutheran World Relief to explore the challenges and opportunities coffee farming present in Latin America.

Join Rainforest Alliance representatives from Central America and Europe in a conversation about the demand of certified products and how coffee buyers approach certification.